The highlights of Hong Kong

I must say that Hong Kong it is one of the most amazing cities I ever been. It is mysterious, modern and has lots to offer. The multicultural people, the aesthetics of Chinese Revival architecture and the food, make this place unique.

Rains a lot in the island and the humidity it is quite high during the summer season. Do not leave the hotel without an umbrella or a light rain jacket, because when it comes, there is no escape. There is air conditioner all around, so if you want to refresh, just stop at a /Eleven or a mall.

In my opinion HK it is way safer than Oslo. And Oslo it is insanely safe. But still, be careful with your valuables on crowded places, such as the metro and buses. But there is no problem about walking around with an expensive camera or mobiles.

Forget everything you know about politeness. If your mom told you to do not burp nearby by the guests, in HK it is not a problem. I couldn’t hold my laugh every time someone farted or burped at a restaurant. Culture!

We all know the Asians are crazy for technology. In HK they take it to a next level: the weird one. I started to think if I’m using my gadgets for my well being or what. In HK they never leave their phones. All the time, anywhere, everywhere, they are connected playing or checking their social media. Was something anormal for me, even thought I still think that in Norway people use their gadgets a lot. But in HKG it is insane!

HK it is a magical place. From the wonderful skyscrapers, passing by the cuisine and culture, the city has lots to offer. Unfortunately, I could not make the Giant Buddha, super expensive and in the end, I just wanted to sleep and rest. But still, here are some of my high points while in the city.

  1. The Peak

Climbing above the financial heart of the Island, the Peak has one of the best views of HK and neighbourhoods. To rise up to the viewpoint, it is necessary to catch the Peak Tram, knowing by been the first cable funicular in Asia, in operation since 1888.

The view at 552m above the sea makes The Peak the highest point on HK and will give you the best panorama of the Island, worth the visit! Do not forget to pay extra to get access to the Panorama 360 view.

  1. Temple Street Night Market

As the name says, the Temple market it is a night market at one of the most famous and busiest streets in Kowloon neighbourhood. At the market, you can find local food at a super cheap price to fake electronics, watches, and bags. Use your bargain abilities to negotiate with the sellers. I can tell that you will be surprised by how easy it is to get a nice price if you just ask. I bought a bag for 100HKD, which cost 280HKD, and of course, they still made money on it. Temple Street Market, it is a physical version of the websites Alibaba and Deal Extreme.

If you wear contact lenses as I do, the best price can be found a few streets up, at Sai Yeung Street. Usually, I buy mine in Brazil, but I got daily lenses for 6 months for 90HKD each box with 30. To have an idea, in Oslo, I would pay circa 500kr for a month.

For the Instax lovers as I’m, the Instax film can be found for 55HKD for 20 pictures. In Oslo it costs 230kr.

IMG_6215.jpgIMG_2985.JPG

  1. Get lost.

I keep saying this because getting lost for me it is one of the best ways to know a place. Start to walk close to your hotel and get to know the facilities nearby. You might be surprised about how much nice stuff you will discover around. In HK I would point Kowloon as a great place to stay and walk around.

  1. Cross HK island to Kowloon on the legendary Star Ferry

This legendary 15min ride from Victoria Harbour takes you to the Kowloon (Central – Tsim Shai Tsui) it is extremely charming and gives you a great view of the skyscrapers during the day and an unforgettable sight of the dancing lights during the night. Star Ferry was founded in 1880 and carry daily more than 5000 thousand passengers, every 15min.The National Geographic Traveler named the ferry crossing as one of 50 places of a lifetime. The ferry ride is also well known as one of the world’s best value-for-money sightseeing trips.Tickets costs 2,50HKD. Take note: there is a tour service with prices from 98HKD.

  1. Disneyland

I love Disneyland. I’m such a Mickey Mouse fan, that I spent 45 min in a giant queue just to take a new picture with it. I had no expectations about the HK version, so when I arrived I was fine about to see the lack of attractions for the grownups. If you have time, I would suggest a visit, but knowing that there are barely 3 attractions for the old ones. Still, it is Disneyland, the place where the magic happens. The price is not bad if we compare to the other Disney parks. A must see: the Lion King show. Impeccable, beautiful and in English. I felt like a kid when I started to sing all the movie’ songs alone since 90% of the crowd was Asian. I could see how disappointed they were.

Info: https://www.hongkongdisneyland.com/

6. Enjoy the architecture

Hong Kong old constructions are knocked down and replaced with taller, shinier versions almost while your back is turned. The Island is keep growing and losing lots of its potentially architecture history. This persistent cycle of destruction and construction won’t stop, so use your time to visit some of the historical buildings.

The brightly colored Alhambra was built in 1958 and it is a commercial/ residential block in the end of the famous Temple Street. The building it is definitely a landmark around the area!

 

 

Info:

To see the HKD value: www.xe.com

Language: Cantonese and Chinese. You will get all the necessary information at metro, buses, airport in English, but this language it is not often used.

My experience eating the cheapest Michelin’ awarded dish

[Português em breve, ou use o tradutor linkado <3]

Forget everything you know about Michelin restaurants being expensive and luxurious. I truly believed myself that could be impossible to eat a Michelin’ dish for less than 10 dollars.

I had the chance to “meet” the hawkers in Singapore, what is more than a simple food court: it takes you to the best kitchen experience in town, maybe in all Asia. And also, the new town of the cheapest Michelin’ awarded restaurant.

In Chinatown, at the Maxwell Food Centre, was time to eat one of the best chicken and rice in the world. So, after 25 minutes in the queue and no air conditioning to combat Singapore’s roasting heat, to buy one of the most famous dishes in Chinatown’s Hawker: rice chicken. The now famous stall “Hong Kong Soya Sauce Chicken Rice & Noodle” is now a milestone for street food in the history of the reputed Michelin Guide.

A giant queue shows that something happened there. Behind a small balcony, three people squeezed into a minimum space to serve one of the dishes that costs from 2USD and tastes like heaven!

According to the Michelin guide, one-star award is given to restaurants that offer “high-quality cooking, worth a stop”. If you ever have a chance to go to Singapore, take a time to dine at this or one of the innumerous Hawkers around the city. An experience for life.

 

Info:

Maxwell Food Centre -Open from 8 to 10pm1 Kadayanallur St, Singapore 069184

1 Kadayanallur St, Singapore 069184

[Trips in Norway] Stryn and Geiranger

[Português em breve, desculpem!!!!]

A trip by the glaciers, towering mountains and a beautiful coastline at the Nordfjord zone

Even if you’ve never ever been in Norway, you have heard that the Norwegian fjords are among the best destination in the world. Close up in a boat or from the shore, or from view points and mountain summits, the fjords are an invitation to enjoy the real Norwegian gem. From South to North of the country, passing by the capital, Oslo, the fjords are a worthy reason to visit Norway. But, where are the breathtaking places?

It isn’t a hard question, though. Expedia took me to discover the Nordfjord, a weekend spent between Stryn and Geiranger, the place internationally known for its awesome fjord view, and one of most fascinating roads in the country.

Stryn is a small town surrounded by stunning nature and glaciers. Even during summer, the glaciers are a big attraction, as the Jostedalsbreen Glacier, the biggest glacier on mainland Europe, that capture people’s attention for all their magnitude and beauty.

The way to Geiranger brings surprises and is a remedy for the eyes. The Trollstigen road affords incredible views of the fjord from a high altitude, from dramatic snow-capped mountains, cascading waterfalls and rivers, green valleys to the weather-beaten ocean landscape. Geiranger is approximately 1h30min from Stryn, by car.

The Geiranger Fjord is part of UNESCO World Heritage and if you come and visit you will understand why. Each year, hundreds of thousands of tourists visit this area, looking to experience all the great places and spectacular nature. The view from the sights on the way are breathtaking: the incredible blue-green sea between the mountains, receiving thousands of tourists every single day during the year. Dalsnibba is one of Geiranger’s main attractions and is a very popular mountain top with visitors to the area. From the Dalsnibba plateau there is an awesome view across the most beautiful World Heritage Site, nestled in the surrounding mountain landscape with Geirangerfjorden right in the middle.

Everybody knows that prices in Scandinavia are particularly high. Stryn/Geiranger are tourist areas, so be prepared for expensive meals and shopping, even for the Norwegian way of life.

Summer is definitely the best time to visit the region if you are planning to go by car and enjoy the ride through the mountains. During the winter the roads are usually closed, due to the snow.

If you are planning to visit Norway and experience a truly Nordic landscape, you must come to the Nordfjord.

IMG_0081 IMG_0110 IMG_9978

 

[Vida na Noruega] Política x imigrantes

Há realmente um “problema de imigração” na Noruega?

A política de abertura à mão de obra estrangeira foi encerrada em 1975. Eram os paquistaneses que acabavam de chegar, então, ao mercado de trabalho norueguês. Essa comunidade, primeira e segunda gerações, representa hoje o grupo mais importante vindo de um país fora da Europa, e a maioria das 90 mil pessoas, da religião muçulmana (vale lembrar que 86% dos 5 milhões de habitantes da Noruega se definem como protestantes luteranos). Os imigrantes que chegaram depois de 1975 são essencialmente cidadãos da União Europeia – Suécia, Polônia, França, Alemanha – empregados pela indústria ou refugiados e exilados submetidos a critérios de aceitação muito estritos.

A Noruega parece não ter conseguido criar uma sociedade multicultural onde a integração não é um problema maior. Muitos noruegueses não aceitam os imigrantes: eles vieram para Oslo (e outras cidades), trouxeram consigo a sua cultura (óbvio) e a grande maioria não se adaptou aos costumes nórdicos: não querem aprender a língua, vivem em suas comunidades, com sua cultura e criam as crianças dentro do regime islâmico, sem nenhuma chance de se tornarem norueguesas de verdade – apenas na certidão, já que uma criança nascida na Noruega não se torna automaticamente norueguesa. O preconceito contra imigrantes é tão grande aqui que existe um Centro contra o racismo. Ser imigrante por aqui não é tarefa fácil e exige paciência.

O governo norueguês é visto como uma mãe para muitos imigrantes.

O feeling de que o país dá dinheiro demais para desempregados e estrangeiros foi fator decisivo para a vitória conservadora nas urnas, dando a Erna Solberg, a cadeira de premier do país. Erna faz parte do Partido Conservador norueguês, de centro-direita, que formou um Governo de coligação com o Partido do Progresso, conhecido pelas suas posições anti-imigração. Ou seja, eles estão trabalhando para transformar a vida dos imigrantes, para pior. O novo regime para a imigração fixa a idade mínima de 24 anos para que um imigrante que viva no país possa estabelecer família com um cidadão estrangeiro. Está prevista igualmente uma maior diferenciação entre os pedidos de asilo, o que acaba por ser, segundo o The Guardian, uma forma de facilitar a deportação.

Com essa nova política imigratória, alguns pedidos de visto tem demorado mais do que o normal. O setor responsável por analisar os pedidos de visto, UDI – Utlendingsdirektoratet tem tirado um tempo maior para analisar os pedidos e o número de deportados também cresceu.

Se você deseja residir na Noruega, você precisa ter uma autorização de residência legítima. Brasileiros tem 90 dias de visto, já que o país faz parte do Espaço Schengen. Passou deste tempo, é multa e você estará sujeito a deportação. Existem várias autorizações de residência para estangeiros na Noruega. As seguintes são as principais:

  • Direito de residência para cidadãos dos países da UE/EEE/EFTA
  • Autorização de residência para refugiados por razões humanitárias graves ou por ligação com a Noruega (razões humanitárias).
  • Pessoas que têm família na Noruega ou que desejam unir com um residente, podem solicitar autorização de união familiar.
  • Autorização de residência para trabalho.

A autorização de residência que lhe é concedida implica determinados direitos e deveres. Todos tem a inteira responsabilidade de aprender quais são as leis e as regras que lhes são aplicados. Os residentes na Noruega tem a obrigação de aprender e respeitaras leis e as regras do país. Tem também a obrigação de fornecer informações correctas quando essas são exigidas pelas autoridades.

Quer migrar para a Noruega? Leia mais no site da Embaixada da Noruega no Brasil e da UDI.

passnorsk

Emprego e mercado de trabalho na Noruega

Recebo muitos emails com uma questão em comum: Polyanna, quero me mudar para Noruega, é fácil arrumar emprego?. Não. Não é fácil. E as coisas não são tão simples quanto as pessoas imaginam: vou arrumar minha malinha e ir para Noruega, porque lá é um país de primeiro mundo e não tem esquerda, nem direita.

Antes de qualquer coisa você precisa pensar em relação ao visto. Como expliquei neste post aqui. A oferta de trabalho por aqui é grande, mas você precisa falar norueguês. Conheci muita gente que me dizia: “Ah, eu falo inglês, me viro”. Na hora que o bicho pegava não falava era nada além de My name is. Claro que tem muita gente que não fala inglês e se vira (adoraria saber como), talvez pela linguagem de sinais. Se eu não falasse inglês tenho certeza de que meu norueguês seria muito melhor a esta altura. Como a maioria dos meus amigos não é daqui, inglês é a minha língua oficial e só uso norueguês se estou alcoolizada ou se me forçam. Escrevo bem, mas na hora de falar, t r a v o. Mas estou trabalhando esse quesito.

Oslo possui uma das taxas de desemprego mais baixas do país, sendo, por isso, um dos locais mais fáceis para encontrar trabalho. Muitas das empresas, sobretudo na área de TI, exigem o domínio do norueguês.

Um órgão que suporta e apoia o recém chegado à Noruega é a NAV–  Agência Serviço de Emprego e Assistência Social. A NAV possui escritórios espalhados pelas Kommunas (região da cidade onde você mora, bairro) e oferece ajuda quando é preciso qualificações para emprego, doença ou outras situações, como por exemplo ajuda econômica e assistência social. Bom frisar que a NAV não tem a responsabilidade sobre a procura ou garantia de trabalho, embora tenha como objetivo facilitar o emprego para a maioria dos indivíduos.

Em 1954, os países nórdicos (Noruega, Suécia, Dinamarca e Finlândia) celebraram acordo formal sobre a livre movimentação de mão de obra. Em 1994, entrou em vigor o acordo EEA, que expandiu o mercado de trabalho norueguês pela adesão ao mercado comum europeu de mão de obra. A nova Lei de Imigração e sua regulamentação, em vigor desde 1º de janeiro de 2010, contêm normas sobre a mão de obra imigrante. A exigência de permissão de trabalho para cidadãos de países UE/EEA/EFTA foi substituída pela exigência de registro junto à UDI.

Num país onde a taxa de desemprego pouco ultrapassa os 3 pontos percentuais, o recrutamento de Engenheiros é um dos principais atrativos, seguido de profissionais ligados ao Marketing e à Economia. A legislação norueguesa apenas prevê um máximo semanal de 37.5 horas de trabalho, sendo qualquer minuto extra obrigatoriamente pago aos trabalhadores. Por ano, o trabalhador tem direito a 25 dias de férias (ou 30, se tiver mais de 60 anos de idade), sendo que parte desses dias são obrigatórios no verão.

Alguns sites que podem ser uteis na busca por emprego:

  1. linkedin.com
  2. indeed.com/no
  3. finn.no/jobb
  4. nav.no
  5. www.workinginnorway.no
  6. www.legejobber.no 
  7. www.monster.no
  8. www.karrierestart.no
  9. www.jobb24.no
  10. www.tu.no/karriere
  11. www.stillinger.no

Quer migrar para a Noruega? Leia mais no site da Embaixada da Noruega no Brasil.

Como funciona a licença paternidade na Noruega?

Licença paternidade no Brasil ainda é algo distante, mas em muitos países, inclusive aqui na Noruega, é um direito dos papais, a pappapermisjon.

Após o nascimento da criança, o pai tem direito a uma dupla licença: primeiro por quinze dias após o parto, e depois num período escolhido por ele para ter 46 semanas de licença, com direito a 100% do salário, ou 56 semanas, com pagamento de 80% do salário.

Para incentivar os homens a cuidarem de seus filhos, uma cota de dez semanas é reservada a eles. Se eles recusam sua pappapermisjon, essas dez semanas são perdidas, uma vez que a mãe não pode tirá-las no lugar do pai.

O inglês Paule Miller vive na cidade norueguesa de Alesund e tem usado a sua licença de paternidade para tirar fotos de sua filha Emily em diferentes situações. Em janeiro deste ano, ele iniciou o projeto denominado Mr. Mum (algo como Mr.Mãe), em que espera registrar momentos da filha em curiosas e engraçadas. E tem conseguido surpreender.

Miller afirma que vai finalizar o “projeto” com a centésima foto.

politi wafflefisk veggie

På norsk har

Sistema Educacional na Noruega: o que Raquel Sheherazade precisa saber.

Essa semana fui bombardeada por amigos que, motivados pela declaração da jornalista Raquel Sheherazade na última semana, queriam saber como funciona o sistema educacional aqui na Noruega. A jornalista, em entrevista ao Programa Pânico, da rádio Jovem Pan, disse que O jovem na Noruega tem tanta informação e oportunidades quanto os jovens do Brasil”. Não vou entrar na questão política, apenas explicar como funciona o sistema aqui na Noruega, do berçário até a universidade.

A Noruega preza pela igualdade. Diferente do Brasil, na escola que seu filho frequentar, ele vai ter amigos de todas as classes sociais, exilados, imigrantes, tudo junto e misturado. Eles crescem sabendo respeitar as diferenças. Engraçado que isso é uma coisa que me faz brilhar os olhos. Na minha vida escolar no Brasil, do maternal à universidade eu era a única negra da sala. Aliás, erámos no máximo 2. Cresci em um meio escolar racista e preconceituoso, em que a cor da minha pele provocava nojo em algumas pessoas (ouvia muitos xingamentos) e burburinhos por onde eu passava.

O acesso ao sistema escolar aqui é gratuito e, em alguns casos o sistema é integral. É bom frisar que em todos os casos acima existe um fee anual, que é praticamente nada.

O ensino é de qualidade, os professores se especializam e tem cursos de reciclagem oferecidos frequentemente. Além do mais, os salários são compatíveis com a atividade, mas como qualquer cidadão, eles vão às ruas e fazem greve, como ano passado no mês de agosto, quando reivindicaram por melhores condições e horas de trabalho.

Vamos então ao que interessa, como funciona o sistema por aqui:

Barnahagen

Esse período é voluntário: você matricula a criança se você quiser. A licença maternidade/paternidade na Noruega dura (somadas), um ano. Após esse período, você pode matricular seu filho em uma creche, chamada aqui de Barnahage. Não é obrigatório, mas para as mães que precisam trabalhar, é uma mão na roda. Se a mãe fica com a criança em casa, ela recebe para isso. Na escolinha as crianças aprendem a conviver com outras e tem atividades educativas, assim como no Brasil.

 Grunnskole: barnaskolen e ungdomsskolen

Esse período escolar é obrigatório, gratuito e vai dos 6 aos 15 anos de idade. Se a criança não for para a escola, os pais são reportados. A criança não tem “nota” até chegar ao próximo nível, aos 10 anos. É quando eles aprendem a ler e escrever e já começam a aprender uma segunda língua, o inglês. Em algumas escolas, nessa fase são ministradas aulas de francês e espanhol. Claro, além das matérias que já são nossas conehcidas, como história, matemática, biologia…

Videregående: 16 – 19 anos

É voluntário, mas também gratuito. Posso comparar ao padrão brasileiro de ensino médio. Existem duas divisões: Studieforberedende ou Yrkesfaglige, que, em bom português é a preparação para a universidade, em que eles escolhem a área de atuação – exatas, humanas, saúde; e Escola Técnica, onde eles aprendem a cozinhar, a fazer pequenos reparos em carpintaria ou mecânica, por exemplo, e já começam a receber um salário e a pagar suas taxas.

Universitet e Høyskole

Voluntário e gratuito, mas com a opção de universidade privada, que chega a custar 15 000 euros por semestre. Høyskole é a nossa versão para faculdade. Durante o curso, se o jovem não tem como conciliar os estudos com o trabalho, o governo subsidia 30% de um empréstimo de cerca de 3.850 reais mensais (10 000 kr) até a conclusão.

Como brasileira, sei que o jovem no Brasil não tem acesso a ¼ do que eu escrevi. Além dos cuidados básicos em saúde ou até mesmo saneamento, o sistema educacional aqui funciona e transforma o jovem através da variedade de atividades e matérias ensinadas na escola. A declaração da jornalista seria cômica se não fosse trágica. Sabemos que a distribuição de renda e da riqueza no país determina o acesso e a permanência dos estudantes na escola, a chamada cultura elitista, ativa no Brasil. Já por aqui o que se vê é uma sistema educacional para todos, sem ser excludente ou homogêneo.

norskkurs

[Passeios em Osl/ Tours in Osl] Sledding at Korketrekkeren / Corrida de trenó

[ENGLISH BELLOW]

Depois de um longo e feliz mês, talvez mais, viajando por aí, aqui estou, de volta ao meu solitário blog.

Então amigos: o inverno tá na área e muitas pessoas me perguntam o que fazer para tentar melhorar a situação. Eu não sou fã do frio, mas eu aprendi a lidar com isso. O que significa: atividades – snowboarding, patinação no gelo, sled…

Um dos mais famosos tobogãs começa em Frognerseter e termina na estação de metrô Midtstuen. No final de uma corrida, você pode pegar o metrô de votla para Frognerseteren e descer novamente. Você pode alugar o seu trenó por 135 kr (preço adulto: óculos + capacete inclusos) para o dia todo. Eu nunca desci mais do que duas vezes porque demora tanto para o metrô chegar que você acaba desanimando.
Posso dizerque eu amo andar de sled. Super ivertido, mas também pode ser perigoso. Quero dizer, você precisa de proteção sempre. Eu já fiz algumas vezes e toda vez parece que é a minha primeira vez descendo a montanha. Se há muita neve, você vai ter velocidade suficiente para fazer os 2000m em aproximadamente 10 minutos.

Vale a pena ir cedo, almoçar por lá e de quebra curtir o visual! Acesse um dos meus vídeos aqui e veja como funciona😀

Antes de chegar à montanha, você pode verificar a câmera ao vivo e ver se vale a pena (se há neve suficiente).

Mais informações aqui.

Holmenkollveien 0710 Oslo. Telef. 22 49 01 21 .info@akeforeningen.no

 [ENGLISH]

After a long and happy month (maybe more) travelling around the globe, here I am, back to my solitary blog.

So, folks: winter is here and many people keep asking me w h a t  t o  d o to make things goes better. Im not a winter fan, but i learned how to live with that. What means: snowboarding, iceskating, sled…

One of the most famous toboggan run starts at Frognerseteren and ends at Midtstuen metro station. At the end of a run, you can catch the metro back up to Frognerseteren for another run. You can rent your sled for 135kr  (adut price: googles + helmet included) for all day. I never had more than 2 rides because its so annoyng wait for the metro – which taked like 15 minutes to go back to the start.

I can tell you that i LOVE sledding. Its fun, but can also be dangerous. I mean, you need to use the protection if you are a newbie. I have done a couple of times and every new time sounds like my first. If there are a lot of snow, you will get velocity to reach the 2000m in approximately 10 minutes.

Before reach to the mountain you can check the live camera and see if its worth it (if there are enough snow).

Its worth to go early, have lunch there and enjoy the view!

More information here.

Holmenkollveien 0710 Oslo. Telef. 22 49 01 21 .info@akeforeningen.no


Korketrekkeren2
Korketrekkeren3

Korketrekkeren

[#GoNordic] Strömstad: If you just know this city to shopping, you need to make up your mind! / Strömstad: Se você só conhece esta cidade para fazer compras, você precisa mudar de ideia!

ENGLISH BELOW

NORWEGIAN

Se você é norueguês ou mora por aqui, você provavelmente conhece Strömstad por uma razão simples: fazer compras. Todos os dias muitas pessoas atravessam a fronteira para ir às compras na cidade. Já falei sobre isso aqui.  Um lugar bonito na costa oeste da Suécia, com preços atrativos e muitos supermercados. Mas, muito mais do que os preços​​, você vai encontrar uma cidade incrível, com uma vida noturna e pontos turísticos!

Eu fui para as Ilhas Koster antes do almoço e no ferry, me vi em meio a um grupo de homens indo comemorar algo que eles chamam de a Távola Redonda. Cerca de 50 homens bebendo cerveja às 11h, muitos já bêbados. Me sentei no primeiro lugar que eu vi e logo um dos caras começou a conversar comigo e explicar sobre o seu “clube de cavalheiros”, algo super interessante. Incomum durante a minha viagem, achei engraçadíssimo alguém me abordar e bater papo comigo durante muito tempo. Durante o dia me encontrei com esses rapazes algumas vezes e, como a cidade é mini, à noite acabei tendo as minhas cervejas pagas por eles no bar de noite. Eu só me lembrava de dois, enquanto praticamente todos me abordavam e diziam: “Você é a jornalista brasileira, Poly?”. Todos me conehciam e eu não conhecia ninguém haha

Primeiro Parque Nacional Marinho da Suécia está localizado em Strömstad e é chamado Kosterhavet, nas Ilhas Koster. As ilhas estão localizadas no norte de Bohuslän e possuim caminhos traçados em meio as muitas áreas de beleza natural, agradáveis ​​para uma caminhada. Há duas ilhas, Nordkoster e Sydkoster: Você pode desfrutar tanto de bicicleta ou a pé. Estas ilhas são as ilhas mais a oeste-habitadas da Suécia, de acordo com a Visit Sweden.

Descobri as duas ilhas, de norte a sul e de leste a oeste, a pé. Um dia inteiro de caminhada, sol e um vento cortante e gelado. Sem dúvidas um ótimo lugar para passar o dia e desfrutar um café enquanto você aprecia a vista!

Strömstad oferece mar e uma natureza incrível, muito além da grande variedade de lojas e também uma vida noturna bastante intensa, o que me surpreendeu!

 

If you are Norwegian you probably know Strömstad for one simple reason: shopping. Everyday a bunch of Norwegian people cross the border to go shopping at this city, a cute place at the west coast of Sweden. But much more than nice prices, you will find an amazing city with a nightlife and great spots!

I went to Koster Islands before lunch and at the ferry, I meet a group of man going to celebrate something that they call the Round Table. Around 50 people drinking beer at 11am, couple drunk. I sat at the first place I saw and soon one of the guys started to talk to me and explain about their “Gentleman’s club”.

Sweden’s first marine national park is located in Strömstad, named Kosterhavet, at the Koster Islands. The islands are located in northern Bohuslän and has a fine network of paths, which run through many areas of great natural beauty, and are nice for a walk. There are two islands, Nordkoster and Sydkoster: you can enjoy both by bike or by walking. These islands are Sweden’s most westerly-inhabited islands, according on Visit Sweden.

I discovered both Islands, north to south and west to east. Great day walking, sunny and really wind. A great place to spend the day and enjoy a cup of coffee while you enjoy the view!

Strömstad offers sea and nature, sailing and town living with a great range of shops and quite nice nightlife!

Ferries to The Kosters Islands leave Strömstad all year-round. You find the time here. To reach the city by Oslo you can take a bus or train to Halden and there change for a local bus.

 

 

140933246728211500_resized

140933252019987000_resized

140933255854271500_thumb


140933272636673800_resized

 

 

 

10 things that will happen when you move to Norway/ 10 coisas que vão acontecer quando você se mudar para Noruega

 

Daí um dia você empacota suas coisas, descobre que a sua vida cabe em 2 malas com 32kg cada e cai de paraquedas em um novo país, nova cultura, novas pessoas e precisa aprender mais do que a língua: a viver na Noruega. Meus caros, eis a minha lista adoro listas! de algumas coisas que vão acontecer quando você se mudar para a Noruega. E acreditem, é tudo verdade!

So, one day you pack your things, discover that your life is all in two pieces of luggage with 32kg each and lands with a parachute in a new country, new culture, new people and more than to learn a new language, you need to learn to live and survive in Norway. My friends, here’s my list I love lists! of some things that will happen when you move to Norway. And believe me, it’s all true!

1. Você vai ter que aprender a esquiar ou a fazer snowboard assim que sair do avião.

Os noruegueses nascem com skis ou pranchas de snowboard nos pés. Sempre amei esportes e me dei ao luxo de tentar aprender snowboard. Obviamente falhei e agora mal posso esperar pelas aulas que vou ter em janeiro. É uma obrigação praticar algum esporte de inverno. De dezembro até a Páscoa, os resorts de Ski ficam lotados e é onde as melhores festas acontecem!

1. You will have to learn to ski or snowboard as soon as you leave the plane.

Norwegians are born with skis or snowboards on their feet. Always loved sports and I gave myself the luxury of trying to learn snowboarding. Obviously, I failed and now I can not wait for the classes I’ll have in January. It is a must DO practice some winter sport. December to Easter Ski resorts are crowded and it’s where the best parties happen!

snowboarding

2. Você vai desejar ter um Marius 

Não, Marius não é um norueguês alto, loiro e maravilhoso. É um suéter típico, feito de lã pura e nas cores da bandeira: azul, vermelho e branco. Alguns são lindos e outros, prefiro não comentar. Não existe uma data específica para se usar, mas normalmente durante as festas de final de ano eles bombam! Ah, o preço: a partir de 500kr.

2. You will desire a Marius

No, Marius is not a tall, blond and hot Norwegian. It is a typical sweater, made of pure wool and in the flag colors: blue, red and white. Some are beautiful and others I prefer not to comment. There is no specific date for use, but usually during the Xmas holidays they rock! Ah, the price: from 500KR (circa 80 USD).

marius

3. Você vai apreciar o sol.

Antes de vir para cá eu dependia da luz do sol pra tudo: desde despertar a ter energia. Mas tinham aqueles dias em que todos os meus amigos ainda reclamam no facebook que eu não conseguia sair de dentro de casa porque era o único lugar “confortável”. Eu sempre amei o calor, nunca reclamei daqueles dias longos em que você chega em casa suada e só quer um banho. Aqui eu aprendi a amar ainda mais. Os dias curtos, cinzentos e gelados são terríveis. Se você ama o inverno, venha para cá e em um mês você muda de opinião. Só não vale vir quando já estiver tudo branquinho e claro! Quando o sol volta, em março/abril, já tem gente correndo para nadar, independente da temperatura. E eu ando meio assim agora. 25 graus para mim já é um tanto quanto terrível. Mas como boa brasileira, eu não reclamo nunca!

3. You will cherish the sun.

Before coming here I depended on sunlight for everything: from waking to have energy. But I had those days when all my friends on facebook still complain that I could not step out of the house because it was the only “comfortable” place to stay in. I always loved the heat, never complained of those long days when you come home sweaty and just want a bath. Here I learned to love even more. The short, gray and cold days are terrible. If you love winter, come back here in a month and you change your mind. Only worth not come when everything is already clear and white one! When the sun back in March / April, there are already people running to swimming, independent of temperature. And I walk half so far. 25 degrees for me is already somewhat terrifying. But how good Brazilian, I never complain!

Herecomesthesun

4. Você vai aprender a pagar muito para tudo.

A Noruega é um dos países mais caros do mundo, como você já deve saber. No começo você vai chorar, mas depois de um tempo vai ver que é extremamente normal pagar 25 reais por 500ml de cerveja em um bar e 10 reais por um pacote de pão de forma. No final do ano você vai dar pulos de alegria ao ver seu importo, que pode chegar a 36%, voltar para você em forma de coroas norueguesas e garantir as suas férias de inverno/ Páscoa Tailândia, aqui vou eu! Mas, a boa notícia é que algumas vezes coisas boas acontecem e você pode fazer a festa na Ikea e nas promoções da HM e comprar uma sapatilha por 50kr (15 reais).

4. You will learn to pay too much for everything.

Norway is one of the most expensive countries in the world, as you may already know. In the beginning, you will cry, but after a while, you will see it is quite usual to pay 12 dollars per 500ml of beer in a bar and 10 dollars for a pack of bread. At the end of the year, you will give leaps with joy to see their care, which can reach 36%, back to you in the form of NOK and ensure your winter/Easter holidays. Thailand, here I come! But, the good news is that sometimes nice things happen and you can have some shopping fun at Ikea or at HM’s sales, and buy a ballerina for 50kr (7 USD).

5. Você vai de alguma forma aprender a gostar de peixe.

Eu amo salmão. Como muito, e se pudesse, todos os dias. Mas aqui não é só de salmão que o noruguês vive. Sardinha ao molho de tomate, o famoso Makrell Tomat no café da manhã, caviar no café da manhã, sopa de peixe a qualquer hora. Se você não gosta de peixe, vai mudar rapidinho de opinião!

5. You will somehow learn to like fish.

I love salmon. I could eat it everyday if I could. But norwegians prefer another kind of fish. Sardines with tomato sauce, the famous Makrell Tomat for breakfast, caviar for breakfast, fish soup anytime. If you do not like fish, you’ll quickly change your mind!

StabburetMakrellTomato

6. Você  vai aprender a comer kvikklunsj durante suas trilhas.

Kvikklunsj, ou “almoço rápido”,é a versão norueguesa do KitKat mas não. Eu não como chocolate, mas experimentei e tentei argumentar que é a versão mal feita do KitKat, mas vai desistir tamanha a decepção dos noruegueses hahaha Levar kvikk Lunsj para as viagens para a cabine, montanha ou trilhas é mais do que obrigação na Noruega. É lei!

6. You will learn to eat kvikklunsj during the hiking.

Kvikklunsj, or “quick lunch” is the Norwegian version of KitKat – but no. I do not like chocolate, but I ate it once and also tried to argue that it is a poorly made version of KitKat, but I gave up after seen such disappointment to the Norwegians hahaha Kvikk lunsj to take trips to the cabin, or mountain hiking is more than obligation in Norway. It’s the law!

kvikk-lunsj

7. Pré-festa vai virar obrigatório antes de sair pra balada.

Aqui você nunca, nunca, mas nunca vai sair de casa para um festa sem ter bebido em casa ou na casa de amigos. O preço do álcool e a limitação de compra faz com que o pre-drink vire item indispensável antes das festinhas!

7. Pre-party will become mandatory before going out to party.

You never, never, will never leave the house for a party without drinking at home or at a friends house. The price of alcohol and limiting the purchase makes the pre-drink before the turn indispensable item!

Pré festa

8. Você vai desistir de aprender norsk ou nunca vai tentar. 

História da minha vida. Pronunciar as vogais Ø, Æ, Å tem sido motivo de briga de casal. Eu simplesmente não consigo colocar tanta informação em forma de som na minha pequena cabeça. Quando penso que tô aprendendo, chega a professora e manda mais uma bomba. Depois de um dia de trabalho, cansada e morta, eu ainda preciso aprender a lidar com isso. Ms vamos que vamos, o caminho tá mais curto!

8. You will give up about learn norsk or will ever try.

Story of my life. Pronounce vowels Ø, Æ, Å has been a hardcore problem. I just can not save too much information about sounds in my head. When I think I’m learning, the teacher comes and give me a bomb. After a day’s work, tired and half-dead, I still need to learn to deal with it. But let it go, the way’s shorter now!

norskkurs

9. Você vai aprender na marra o limite de álcool e os horários de compra.

Álcool na Noruega é regulamentado, o que significa que ou você paga muito nos bares, por conta dos impostos de venda, ou você se adapta ao sistema e compra nos horários determinados (até às 20h durante a semana e no final de semana até às 16h) ou nos Vinmonopolet, que são nada mais do que lojas especializadas que vendem todo tipo de álcool por preços nada justos abusivos.Ah, no domingo é impossível! Ou, como boa brasileira, faça como eu: viaje muito e, quando você chegar no aeroporto, na volta, corra até o Tax Free (sim, os noruegueses correm, parece maratona) e abasteça sua adega! Ou traga na mala.

Mas lembre-se dos limites (rídiculo) impostos pelo Governo Norueguês, ou você vai para cadeia noruega e paga um rim pela multa.

9. You’ll learn, even on the hard way, the limit of alcohol and hours of purchase.

Alcohol in Norway is regulated, which means that either you pay a lot in bars, on account of sales tax, or do you adapt to the system and buy it at determined time (until 20h during the week and at the weekend up to 16h ) or at the Vinmonopolet, which is nothing more than specialty shops selling all kind of alcohol based on Norwegian prices. Ah on Sunday’s impossible! Or, as good Brazilian, as I do: travel a lot and when you arrive at the airport, run to the Tax-Free (yes, the Norwegians run, looks like a marathon) and fill up! Or bring in the suitcase from where you came from.

But remember the limits (what is nothing) imposed by the Norwegian Government, or you go to jail and will pay a kidney as fine.

Alcohol quote

10. Se você não é adepto, vai aprender que domingo é dia de “går på tur”.

Domingo é dia de sair de casa e curtir a natureza. Trilhas, andar pela floresta, picnics. Não importa, domingo, apra os noruegueses é dia de fazer alguma coisa ao ar livre. E para mim continua ser ficar em casa e dormir até o meio-dia. Tá, às vezes eu vou também!

10. If you are not adept, will learn that Sunday  is the “går på tur” day.

Sunday is the day to go out and enjoy nature. Hiking, walk through the woods, picnics. No matter, Sunday, for the Norwegians is the day to do something outdoors. And for me continues to be “to stay home and sleep until noon”. But yeah, sometimes I go too!

Preikestolen

4. Você vai aprender a pagar muito para tudo.

A Noruega é um dos países mais caros do mundo, como você já deve saber. No começo você vai chorar, mas depois de um tempo vai ver que é extremamente normal pagar 25 reais por 500ml de cerveja em um bar e 10 reais por um pacote de pão de forma. No final do ano você vai dar pulos de alegria ao ver seu importo, que pode chegar a 36%, voltar para você em forma de coroas norueguesas e garantir as suas férias de inverno/ Páscoa Tailândia, aqui vou eu! Mas, a boa notícia é que algumas vezes coisas boas acontecem e você pode fazer a festa na Ikea e nas promoções da HM e comprar uma sapatilha por 50kr (15 reais).

4. You will learn to pay too much for everything.

Norway is one of the most expensive countries in the world, as you may already know. In the beginning, you will cry, but after a while, you will see it is quite usual to pay 12 dollars per 500ml of beer in a bar and 10 dollars for a pack of bread. At the end of the year, you will give leaps with joy to see their care, which can reach 36%, back to you in the form of NOK and ensure your winter/Easter holidays. Thailand, here I come! But, the good news is that sometimes nice things happen and you can have some shopping fun at Ikea or at HM’s sales, and buy a ballerina for 50kr (7 USD).

5. Você vai de alguma forma aprender a gostar de peixe.

Eu amo salmão. Como muito, e se pudesse, todos os dias. Mas aqui não é só de salmão que o noruguês vive. Sardinha ao molho de tomate, o famoso Makrell Tomat no café da manhã, caviar no café da manhã, sopa de peixe a qualquer hora. Se você não gosta de peixe, vai mudar rapidinho de opinião!

5. You will somehow learn to like fish.

I love salmon. I could eat it everyday if I could. But norwegians prefer another kind of fish. Sardines with tomato sauce, the famous Makrell Tomat for breakfast, caviar for breakfast, fish soup anytime. If you do not like fish, you’ll quickly change your mind!

StabburetMakrellTomato

6. Você  vai aprender a comer kvikklunsj durante suas trilhas.

Kvikklunsj, ou “almoço rápido”,é a versão norueguesa do KitKat mas não. Eu não como chocolate, mas experimentei e tentei argumentar que é a versão mal feita do KitKat, mas vai desistir tamanha a decepção dos noruegueses hahaha Levar kvikk Lunsj para as viagens para a cabine, montanha ou trilhas é mais do que obrigação na Noruega. É lei!

6. You will learn to eat kvikklunsj during the hiking.

Kvikklunsj, or “quick lunch” is the Norwegian version of KitKat – but no. I do not like chocolate, but I ate it once and also tried to argue that it is a poorly made version of KitKat, but I gave up after seen such disappointment to the Norwegians hahaha Kvikk lunsj to take trips to the cabin, or mountain hiking is more than obligation in Norway. It’s the law!

kvikk-lunsj

7. Pré-festa vai virar obrigatório antes de sair pra balada.

Aqui você nunca, nunca, mas nunca vai sair de casa para um festa sem ter bebido em casa ou na casa de amigos. O preço do álcool e a limitação de compra faz com que o pre-drink vire item indispensável antes das festinhas!

7. Pre-party will become mandatory before going out to party.

You never, never, will never leave the house for a party without drinking at home or at a friends house. The price of alcohol and limiting the purchase makes the pre-drink before the turn indispensable item!

Pré festa

8. Você vai desistir de aprender norsk ou nunca vai tentar. 

História da minha vida. Pronunciar as vogais Ø, Æ, Å tem sido motivo de briga de casal. Eu simplesmente não consigo colocar tanta informação em forma de som na minha pequena cabeça. Quando penso que tô aprendendo, chega a professora e manda mais uma bomba. Depois de um dia de trabalho, cansada e morta, eu ainda preciso aprender a lidar com isso. Ms vamos que vamos, o caminho tá mais curto!

8. You will give up about learn norsk or will ever try.

Story of my life. Pronounce vowels Ø, Æ, Å has been a hardcore problem. I just can not save too much information about sounds in my head. When I think I’m learning, the teacher comes and give me a bomb. After a day’s work, tired and half-dead, I still need to learn to deal with it. But let it go, the way’s shorter now!

norskkurs

9. Você vai aprender na marra o limite de álcool e os horários de compra.

Álcool na Noruega é regulamentado, o que significa que ou você paga muito nos bares, por conta dos impostos de venda, ou você se adapta ao sistema e compra nos horários determinados (até às 20h durante a semana e no final de semana até às 16h) ou nos Vinmonopolet, que são nada mais do que lojas especializadas que vendem todo tipo de álcool por preços nada justos abusivos.Ah, no domingo é impossível! Ou, como boa brasileira, faça como eu: viaje muito e, quando você chegar no aeroporto, na volta, corra até o Tax Free (sim, os noruegueses correm, parece maratona) e abasteça sua adega! Ou traga na mala.

Mas lembre-se dos limites (rídiculo) impostos pelo Governo Norueguês, ou você vai para cadeia noruega e paga um rim pela multa.

9. You’ll learn, even on the hard way, the limit of alcohol and hours of purchase.

Alcohol in Norway is regulated, which means that either you pay a lot in bars, on account of sales tax, or do you adapt to the system and buy it at determined time (until 20h during the week and at the weekend up to 16h ) or at the Vinmonopolet, which is nothing more than specialty shops selling all kind of alcohol based on Norwegian prices. Ah on Sunday’s impossible! Or, as good Brazilian, as I do: travel a lot and when you arrive at the airport, run to the Tax-Free (yes, the Norwegians run, looks like a marathon) and fill up! Or bring in the suitcase from where you came from.

But remember the limits (what is nothing) imposed by the Norwegian Government, or you go to jail and will pay a kidney as fine.

Alcohol quote

10. Se você não é adepto, vai aprender que domingo é dia de “går på tur”.

Domingo é dia de sair de casa e curtir a natureza. Trilhas, andar pela floresta, picnics. Não importa, domingo, apra os noruegueses é dia de fazer alguma coisa ao ar livre. E para mim continua ser ficar em casa e dormir até o meio-dia. Tá, às vezes eu vou também!

10. If you are not adept, will learn that Sunday  is the “går på tur” day.

Sunday is the day to go out and enjoy nature. Hiking, walk through the woods, picnics. No matter, Sunday, for the Norwegians is the day to do something outdoors. And for me continues to be “to stay home and sleep until noon”. But yeah, sometimes I go too!

Preikestolen